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How & When To Reseason A Carbon Steel Pan

Our Blue Carbon Steel Pan is a perfect hybrid of a cast iron skillet and a stainless steel frying pan, meaning it has cast iron’s heat retention, seasoning, and non-stick properties from cast iron with the benefits of stainless steel ’s heat control and cooking speed. And best of all, it’s lighter than both cast iron and stainless steel, it seasons more quickly than cast iron, and it’s meant to get dirty. In fact, the more blackened and worn it gets, the better it performs.

But the key to getting the most out of your Carbon Steel pan is maintaining its seasoning and slick surface. 

After you're initial seasoning, you'll likely run into two common issues that mean it's time to reasons to re-season your pan.

When do you reseason your carbon steel pan?

After your initial seasoning, you'll likely run into two common issues that mean it's time to reasons to re-season your pan.

Reason #1 - You haven’t used the pan in a long time.

You might see some rust-like patina or it’ll feel rough or rusty to the touch. Don't worry! It's still perfectly good. There's no need to throw it away or stop using it. Your pan is just telling you that it’s time to re-season.

Scrub off patina or roughness with an abrasive sponge, and apply 1-2 teaspoon of oil on a skillet, wiping away the extra oil with a paper towel. Heat your pan over medium heat until the oil starts to bead. When you see the beads, take your paper towel and wipe away the oil. When the pan starts to smoke, leave it for two minutes and then turn off the heat and let the skillet cool. Voila!

Reason #2 - Your pan is getting nasty with old food

You love your pan, but maybe you love it a little too hard sometimes. If you have too much thickness, stickiness, and old food residue on the bottom of the pan and you can't remove it with a simple cleaning, it's time to wipe the slate clean and restart your seasoning.

Don’t worry, it’s not as dire as it sounds. In fact, it's pretty easy. 

Heat your pan over medium heat until a droplet of water is able to able to evaporate when it hits the pan. Remove your pan from the heat source and pour 2 tablespoons of salt and 1 tablespoon of oil into the pan. Using a paper towel or old dish towel, scrub this mixture all over the pan until the gunk starts to loosen. At this point, rinse with hot water and pat the pan dry. Be sure to remove all moisture.

Then, apply 1-2 teaspoon of oil on a skillet, wiping away the extra oil with a paper towel. Heat your pan over medium heat until the oil starts to bead. When you see the beads, take your paper towel and wipe away the oil. When the pan starts to smoke, leave it for two minutes and then turn off the heat and let the skillet cool. It should be slick to the touch and free of gunk.

If these issues don't apply to you and you think there's another reason to re-seaon, let us know. We'd love to hear what types of issues you've encountered on the front lines of Carbon cooking.

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