How to Cook Boudin, 3 Ways

Learn how to make the most of these sausage links.

Team Made In|Aug 01, 2022
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Looking to cook up a cajun-inspired dish for your next meal? If so, then you can't go wrong with boudin. There are many different ways to prepare this type of sausage, and it's not difficult to get it right. Still, if you've never worked with boudin before, there are some practical tips you can follow regardless of whether you plan to boil, roast, or grill.

What Is Boudin?

While it may look like a traditional pork sausage, it contains much more than that. Exact boudin recipes can vary, but most contain some combination of pork, vegetables, and rice.

Boudin

is a staple in Cajun and creole-inspired dishes, and is often found in Jambalaya or even served up for breakfast along with a side of grits and eggs.

Boudin isn't particularly difficult to work with, but there are a few different ways to cook it that you'll want to be familiar with. This includes boiling, baking, and grilling.

How to Boil Boudin

Boiling or poaching boudin is ideal if you want to avoid the outside of the links getting crispy, while still ensuring that each sausage is thoroughly cooked. To boil or poach boudin, begin by filling a large

Stock Pot

with water.

A Saute Pan

would also be a nice choice. You may also want to add some seasonings to the water (such as salt, pepper, and even Cajun seasoning) to add extra flavor.

Next, bring the water to a boil and carefully add the sausage links. Be sure that each link is completely submerged in the water. Turn down the heat so that the water is simmering (not boiling), then allow the sausages to cook for 10-15 minutes. Check with a meat thermometer to ensure that the internal temperature is at least 160F—and your boudin will be ready to serve or incorporate into your dish.

How to Roast Boudin

Roasting boudin may be a more practical option if you want to get a nice, crispy skin on the outside of each sausage link. To roast boudin, simply preheat your oven to 300F. Then, place your boudin links on a lightly oiled

Sheet Pan

or

Roasting Pan

, making sure that the links are not touching.

From there, cook the boudin sausage links for 20 minutes, taking time to flip each link about every five minutes to ensure even cooking. Once the links have reached 160F, they will be ready to enjoy.

How to Grill Boudin

If you need to cook your boudin quickly without losing out on that delicious flavor, grilling is the way to go. Begin by preheating your grill to medium-low heat. This is easy enough if you're using a gas grill—but if you're using charcoal, you can achieve medium-low heat by using only enough charcoal to cover the bottom of the grill.

Next, place the sausage links directly on the grill for a crispy casing. If you prefer a softer casing without that crispiness, you can wrap the boudin in aluminum foil before you grill it, or use a

Grill Frying Pan

on the grill grates. Regardless, boudin sausages should be cooked for about 2-5 minutes per side until they reach an internal temperature of 160F.

How to Enjoy Boudin

Once your boudin is thoroughly cooked, it's ready to be enjoyed as-is or added to a favorite dish. Consider slicing up cooked boudin to add to Jambalaya, serving it on a bun with your favorite toppings, or even enjoying it on its own with a creole-inspired side (like

Louisiana dirty rice

).You can use these same tips for boiling, baking, and grilling boudin for other popular types of sausage—including Italian sausage, bratwurst, and chorizo.

Regardless of how you decide to enjoy your boudin, we can help you cook it perfectly every time. Check out our selection of Stock Pots, Baking Sheets, and more to elevate your cooking experience.