How To Get The Most Out Of Your Stock Pot

by Michaela Meeks

One thing people who shy away from the kitchen may hate about cooking is the tons of cleanup afterward. From the saucers to other pots and pans, and dishes – some days, you just can’t be bothered to wash them all. We all have those lazy days where a delicious, fuss-free meal also means easy cleanup. On these days, Made In’s Stock Pot can be your best friend. Contrary to what the name implies, this pot isn’t just suited to make your favorite vegetable, chicken, and beef stocks. Its large capacity holds so much potential. 

Here are some meal ideas that will help you get the most out of your stock pot – and they are flexible enough to be adapted to your own tastes as well!

stock pot crawfish boil

Sausage and Bean Stew

If you have some cans of beans sitting on your cupboard shelves waiting to be noticed, look no further. You can breathe some life back into those old beans with a sausage and bean stew. This stock pot recipe just entails frying the sausages until they are golden brown, before removing them briefly to fry your onions, celery, garlic, rosemary, and other aromatics before adding in some chicken stock.

Once everything has come to a boil, you can reduce the heat and put the sausages and beans in. Get everything simmering before swirling in some butter for richness, and parsley and lemon zest for a zing of freshness. This hearty stew is packed with flavor, and you can experiment with variations of sausages and beans to create a fully customizable meal. Don’t forget the crusty bread to sop up that sauce.

Greek Spinach and Rice

Also known as Spanakorizo, Greek spinach and rice is similar to risotto in its creamy texture, but requires much less action. This one-pot dish has core ingredients of spinach, onion, and rice, but there is a lot of room to put your own spin on it with garlic, parsley, leeks, meats, or cheese – basically, anything you have in the refrigerator. Before getting started, you need to wash your rice. This rids the grains of any imperfections and refines its quality once it’s cooked. After rinsing your grains with a rice washer, you’ll immediately notice the improvement in texture when the dish has been assembled.

When this has been prepped, you can set it aside and sauté the herbs, vegetables, and spices in the pot before adding back the rice to toast. You can then add in the broth of your choice before bringing everything to a boil, stirring occasionally. Spice it up with additional seasoning and let everything come together before garnishing with some lemon, freshly cracked pepper, and perhaps even some feta for added creaminess.

One-Pot Pasta

Tired of estimating how hot your water has to be or how long you have to let your noodles boil until your pasta is perfectly al dente? Scared to wind up overcooking your noodles when you add them into your sauce? This one-pot pasta dish is for anyone who has these thoughts regularly. In your big stock pot, all you have to do is to boil together pasta, chicken broth, diced tomatoes, sliced yellow onion, dried oregano, garlic cloves, basil, salt, and olive oil. After 12 to 15 minutes, you can reduce the heat and cover the pot until the pasta is at your desired consistency and texture.

When you remove it from the heat, you can stir in some spinach and cheese. If you want some additional protein, you can add in shrimp or chicken as well.

If there’s anything these no recipe recipes can tell you, it’s that one stock pot can yield endless possibilities. With rough guides, you can optimize your Made In Stock Pot. Buy yours here

stock pots



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